COVID-19, Hydroxychloroquine, and the Promise of Clinical Trials

By | Clinical Trials

As the scientific community races to establish treatment regimens for COVID-19, clinical trials have been thrust into the spotlight as clinicians and policymakers alike seek data to inform their decisions. The ability to interpret clinical trial data and expedite new clinical trials will be critical in obtaining and leveraging key insights on how to manage this pandemic.   Hydroxychloroquine has garnered much attention in this regard. It is currently approved in the United States for the treatment of malaria, lupus, and rheumatoid arthritis. While preclinical data suggest that hydroxychloroquine is an inhibitor of COVID-19 within in vitro cell lines1, the…

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Slash Costs in Clinical Trials with Your Own BYOD Calculator

By | Clinical Trials

We received such positive feedback on my last blog about the benefits of a bring-your-own-device (BYOD) approach to patient connectivity in clinical trials that I decided to offer additional thinking on the subject. If the last article exploded technical myths, here we’ll explore something else many people haven’t fully considered: the costs savings. Aiming for Perfect Trial Execution Let’s start by playing out a scenario. You’re in Phase 3 of a high-profile study that your team has been working on for years. You are determined that it be perfectly executed as you move into the regulatory stage. Let’s say your…

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6 Myths About Bring-Your-Own-Device (BYOD) Studies

By | Clinical Trials

While the pharmaceutical industry stands poised to plunge forward into patient connectivity – and thus begin to realize the enormous potential benefits for clinical trials – some decision-makers remain skeptical about bring-your-own-device (BYOD). There’s strong evidence that allowing participants in clinical trials to use their own smartphones to enter health outcome data can boost retention, enhance data integrity, and increase compliance. Yet today, BYOD is used in a small fraction of clinical trials. That’s enough to make you scratch your head. The rate of compliance for studies with BYOD is estimated at 10-20% higher than for studies using a provisioned…

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