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Employee Spotlight – Tracey Larrow

Our company is filled with incredible individuals, and our Employee Spotlight series aims to highlight the remarkable minds behind our company. 

We’re continuing our monthly series by speaking with our Senior Director Translation Architect, Tracey Larrow.

Would you please explain your role at Datacubed Health?
Of course, Jenna. So, I am the Senior Director Translation Architect here at Datacubed, which basically means I’m the resident subject matter expert (SME) for translations. I’m here to help our customers, and internal teams navigate the crazy world of ePRO translations. My day includes weighing in on best practices, making a translation methodology recommendation, or helping guide a customer through EC/IRB submission options when timelines don’t align. Second, I want to help Datacubed change how we manage translations so that it takes the pressure off our project management team and makes managing translations more scalable as we grow. These changes will also help separate us in the market since translations generally aren’t seen as an area for innovation.

How did you land at Datacubed Health? Can you tell us more about your career journey?
I’ve been working in translations for over ten years, and I started as a Project Manager at TransPerfect. After a few years at TPT, a friend of mine recommended me for a job as a Translation Coordinator at PHT. Next year will be my ten-year “workiversary” in ePRO. When ERT acquired PHT, I became a Team Lead for the Boston-based translation team members. When I left ERT, I was the Translation and Licensing Team Manager, with roughly 30 translation coordinators and licensing specialists on the team spread across four office locations. Next, I stepped into a director role at Clinical Ink. While there, I focused on translation innovation and starting a translation team. I was also very involved in the launch of a library initiative. Then in April of this year, I started talking with Kyle Hogan about translations at Datacubed and decided to join the team.

What do you like most about your job at Datacubed Health?
What I like most about my job is the freedom to think outside the box regarding how we manage translations. It’s so exciting to have a creative license to solve problems (like manual screenshots, screenshot reviews, translation tracking, etc.) that have been part of the translation landscape in ePRO for years. The opportunities for improvement are seemingly endless, and I love having the open invitation to solve them with the help of the fantastic team here.

What motivates you to wake up and work every day?
It could be the last day that I have to take screenshots manually. Just kidding – it’s that nothing is standing between me and the future of translations in ePRO except the limits of my creativity and what our skilled engineers tell me isn’t possible with today’s technology.

What is something that most people don’t know about you?
I am terrified of spiders because I had a bird spider (look it up!) land within an inch of my bare foot while traveling in a small boat down the Amazon River. I’ve never been the same!

Could you please share a quote or motto that you live by that could inspire others?
Don’t take this the wrong way, senior leadership – but my motto is “it’s just a job.” I tell myself this a lot to keep things in perspective. If I have a tough decision to make, if I feel stuck on how to proceed, if a project isn’t going the way I want it to, or if my inbox is out of control, I tell myself that it’s just a job. It helps me remember that I’m just one person, doing the best I can and that I may not get it right 100% of the time, but what matters is moving forward instead of letting the pressure (whether internal or external) make me feel stuck.

We thank Tracey for her contributions to our company over the past year, and we’re so lucky to have her on the Datacubed Health team. Watch this space next month for another Employee Spotlight.

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